*** [ dub / reggae / HK underground ] *** Hong Kong's Premiere Music Blog *** [ exclusive DJ mixes ] ***
Half a year has passed since Brooklyn’s Tour De Force - the production name for the Dub-Stuy Records duo of Quoc Pham and Jay Spaker - released Battle Cry, and now their debut album is being revisited, receiving the remix treatment from an impressive list of heavyweight dubbers. Remixers could apparently select their own tracks, so eight of the original ten tunes appear here (“Warmongers” and “Tiger Style” being left out). Thus, this is much more of a selector’s dream than a standard LP.
 
DJ Madd starts things off, infusing the instrumental title cut with his trademark thick booming 140 bass, while keeping the triumphant horns intact. Then Double Tiger, Jay Spaker’s production moniker, infuses some rolling low-end funk on his re-interpretation. Next up, “Old Time Love” (with Spaker on vocals) journeys to New Zealand (Dub Terminator) and France (Ondubground), with elements of glitchy jungle and hazy electrodub being featured respectively - both nicely done.
 
“Pool Party,” a Jahdan Blakkamoore-voiced take on the infamous Sleng Teng riddim, is now a slow-simmering boomer in the hands of Dubsworth, while Jahtari’s Naram filters the original sound so it’s intact but subdued. Brother Culture’s conscious turn on “Roots Lyrics” is beefed up by Brain Damage, but Reggae Roaster Adam Prescott arguably pushes the future bass vibes a bit more…
 
Dubwise duo Hylu & Jago let the drums stutter about on “Strong To Survive,” but they also bring in some 16-bit sensibilities and the occasional breath of silence; stellar results. Spaker’s other vocal cut, “A Little Bit More,” is taken in opposite directions by Dubmatix and Dub Gabriel. The former stays more organic while letting the vocal soar, the latter pushes the pace with a more electronic sound.
 
Clearly Luciano’s “Where Do We Go Wrong” was the track of choice here, as B-No, Fogata Sounds, and Reality Chant all take it in (thankfully) different directions. B-No channels Dubmatix a bit, while fellow French crew Fogata Sounds airs the vocal out before dropping some rolling digi-bass. Meanwhile, Kiwi producer Reality Chant takes the tune on a sprawling seven-minute laid-back steppers journey. The closer, “The Traveler,” finds Step-Art teasing the plucked string melody while the electo-tinged beat steps onwards.
 
Overall an engaging effort and it’s nice to see such international collaborations. Most selectors will easily find a few remixes to fit into their sets, though it is DJ Madd’s that will surely be attracting the most attention. Available through a variety of digital retailers and also on CD. My review of the original album is here.
 

 
Half a year has passed since Brooklyn’s Tour De Force - the production name for the Dub-Stuy Records duo of Quoc Pham and Jay Spaker - released Battle Cry, and now their debut album is being revisited, receiving the remix treatment from an impressive list of heavyweight dubbers. Remixers could apparently select their own tracks, so eight of the original ten tunes appear here (“Warmongers” and “Tiger Style” being left out). Thus, this is much more of a selector’s dream than a standard LP.

 

DJ Madd starts things off, infusing the instrumental title cut with his trademark thick booming 140 bass, while keeping the triumphant horns intact. Then Double Tiger, Jay Spaker’s production moniker, infuses some rolling low-end funk on his re-interpretation. Next up, “Old Time Love” (with Spaker on vocals) journeys to New Zealand (Dub Terminator) and France (Ondubground), with elements of glitchy jungle and hazy electrodub being featured respectively - both nicely done.

 

“Pool Party,” a Jahdan Blakkamoore-voiced take on the infamous Sleng Teng riddim, is now a slow-simmering boomer in the hands of Dubsworth, while Jahtari’s Naram filters the original sound so it’s intact but subdued. Brother Culture’s conscious turn on “Roots Lyrics” is beefed up by Brain Damage, but Reggae Roaster Adam Prescott arguably pushes the future bass vibes a bit more…

 

Dubwise duo Hylu & Jago let the drums stutter about on “Strong To Survive,” but they also bring in some 16-bit sensibilities and the occasional breath of silence; stellar results. Spaker’s other vocal cut, “A Little Bit More,” is taken in opposite directions by Dubmatix and Dub Gabriel. The former stays more organic while letting the vocal soar, the latter pushes the pace with a more electronic sound.

 

Clearly Luciano’s “Where Do We Go Wrong” was the track of choice here, as B-No, Fogata Sounds, and Reality Chant all take it in (thankfully) different directions. B-No channels Dubmatix a bit, while fellow French crew Fogata Sounds airs the vocal out before dropping some rolling digi-bass. Meanwhile, Kiwi producer Reality Chant takes the tune on a sprawling seven-minute laid-back steppers journey. The closer, “The Traveler,” finds Step-Art teasing the plucked string melody while the electo-tinged beat steps onwards.

 

Overall an engaging effort and it’s nice to see such international collaborations. Most selectors will easily find a few remixes to fit into their sets, though it is DJ Madd’s that will surely be attracting the most attention. Available through a variety of digital retailers and also on CD. My review of the original album is here.

 

 

Big things making the Hong Kong underground rumble… maybe it’s our city’s wealth of musical creativity, or it could just be pure typhoonery! Regardless, there’s a lot of quality music to explore in this edition of the #HKMU, so make sure your ears are properly prepared.
 
Ready? Here we go: EazyBeatz has dropped his E-Zilla Beat-Tape, loaded up with 12 original beats as well as 8 full tracks. Ever prolific, he takes The Godfather to the trap on a Project Kazoku beat, too:
 


 
DJ Redman’s SinistaSounds project gets a bit explorative (is that the best word?) on “Poosie’Whole” featuring Kranky Stank Manky, which is about just what you think it is. Redman & EazyBeatz also team up for a “Rooftop DJ Session” with some bonus footage from Redman’s recent BOOM Battle:
 


 
Razaelus enters the #HKMU arena with two mixtapes of pulsating psytrance. “Reptilian Sodomy” pushes 172bpm inside your brain, while “Death Without Purpose” almost feels slow by comparison:
 


 
After a fierce-but-losing duel with the Soundcloud powers that be, Yiannis' mix for oma has found a happier and controversy-free home on Mixcloud. DJ Romi B’s mix was rolled out yesterday as well, pushing things deeper:
 


 
SJOKK PANTER is back to mixing in a triumphant way, with five mixes out in less than two weeks. There’s the four-parts of “HUSBRØDRE” (meaning ‘house brothers’) and then the first part of the lush hiphop of “KVART SVART” (‘Black Granite’) is available as well. 
 


 
Casey Anderson's latest mix was recorded live at Woobar, and is 45 minutes of groovy house:
 

 
A big chillout selection comes from CAFÉ DEL MAR IBIZA, as Hara's tune “Message To You” has been added as a bonus to the 20th Anniversary re-release of their influential first compilation. Hara’s more uptempo side, Arun R, also has a September playlist out. 
 

 
There’s a Youtube Cypher afoot in the HK rapiverse, as a digital challenge is causing real mics to get passed. Jay.L seems the originator, with Heyo quickly in on the action, plus flows from Westdoor 西門, Kiki Tam, Quilla 月喬, and more. 8workshop is your source:
 

 
Jim Choi's hard at rework on both the funky “Power” and the soaring clap of “Bleeding Love.” Great to see a beatmaker go public with such diverse productions:
 


 
On “講男講女,” Kwokkin examines relationships, emphasising the issue of public abuse of men by women in Hong Kong. Over a rolling beat, the fast-paced lyrics are paired with humorous cartoons and Youtube clips:
 

 
Another nice Canto-hop track comes courtesy of Triple G, with production duties handled by Canvas. On Wild$tyle Records, “白日夢一場” is a bit mellow, with some nice swirling strings and keys:
 

 
Sneak Peak has begun a new monthly mixtape series, “Early Riser,” with appropriate morning music being featured in this collaboration with French webzine La Pause:
 

 
J-Hoon takes on a legend on his re-edit of “Juicy” in Atari-Transformer style. Low-bit beats ensue. His “Hands Up 舉高手2014 Remix” also got a shout-out from Indielicious on GFM.FM.
 

 
Sert asserts his drum ‘n’ bass side on his latest “Soul Healing Session,” which goes deeper into the jungle than the past few more liquid volumes.
 

 
In other dnb news, Con*Natural & Arkham’s set from Clockenflap 2013 has surfaced, just in time as this year’s artist announcements have begun, stirring up excitement for the 2014 festival!
 

 
In honour of the recent Italo-Disco night “Another Life III,” guest DJ Lyova prepared an exclusive mix:
 

 
Jeremy Cheung has a soulful new house mix out, quite literally since it was recorded on a Sunday at home rather than on the weekend at a club like his mixes regularly are:
 

 
SAiNT takes on Drake (or should it be DRaKE?), with his cover of “0 to 100.” Lyrics included as the veteran MC vents:
 

 
With the bass thwomping, DJ Seth Gutierrez drops his bootleg remix of Chainsmokers x John Newman. “Can you love me again?”
 

 
Nearing the limits of what the #HKMU will report upon, MC Jin's personal and heartfelt track “Chinese New Year,” is an interesting exploration of his Chinese-American experience. To be honest, in between brags and cliches, even he concedes “credibility gone” …
 

 
On the literary side of things, several features have popped up recently on HK underground artists. Ghost Style got a full write-up in the SCMP from Oliver Clasper, and for BOOM Magazine, the prolific writer also got dnb heavyweight DBridge on the phone in advance of his upcoming show with Magnetic Soul (for their 9th Anniversary). Finally, Sensi Lion took on some smoky topics in an interview for HK Magazine.
 
Macanese bassologist Achun has a fresh remix out, of A New Step Back’s “Love Evaporates.” A Beatport exclusive:
 

 
Through MacauBlacklist, the slow-beat on “唔成熟嘅細路” pairs quite nicely with the uptempo vocals from 七龍雞(7DC) Ft. LH & Monkey.
 

 
Bass label FTK has released a four-track EP from Macau artist Noise808, entitled ESCLTE. Expect sparse heaviness, with chopped up samples. The artist also just dropped a preview of “High’Point” which moves more into cinematic territory:
 


 
And what about yours truly The Groove Thief? Beyond typing myself towards the tunnel of carpal, I recently interviewed Suns of Dub and Masia One, and also released a politically-themed mixtape that CY has yet to get back to me about… doesn’t he read the newspaper?!
 

 
Keep making epic music Hong Kong.
Keep making music epic Hong Kong.
And remember to stand up for your rights.
 
Big things making the Hong Kong underground rumble… maybe it’s our city’s wealth of musical creativity, or it could just be pure typhoonery! Regardless, there’s a lot of quality music to explore in this edition of the #HKMU, so make sure your ears are properly prepared.

 

Ready? Here we go: EazyBeatz has dropped his E-Zilla Beat-Tape, loaded up with 12 original beats as well as 8 full tracks. Ever prolific, he takes The Godfather to the trap on a Project Kazoku beat, too:

 


 

DJ Redman’s SinistaSounds project gets a bit explorative (is that the best word?) on “Poosie’Whole” featuring Kranky Stank Manky, which is about just what you think it is. Redman & EazyBeatz also team up for a “Rooftop DJ Session” with some bonus footage from Redman’s recent BOOM Battle:

 

 

Razaelus enters the #HKMU arena with two mixtapes of pulsating psytrance. “Reptilian Sodomy” pushes 172bpm inside your brain, while “Death Without Purpose” almost feels slow by comparison:

 

 

After a fierce-but-losing duel with the Soundcloud powers that be, Yiannis' mix for oma has found a happier and controversy-free home on Mixcloud. DJ Romi B’s mix was rolled out yesterday as well, pushing things deeper:

 

 

SJOKK PANTER is back to mixing in a triumphant way, with five mixes out in less than two weeks. There’s the four-parts of “HUSBRØDRE” (meaning ‘house brothers’) and then the first part of the lush hiphop of “KVART SVART” (‘Black Granite’) is available as well.

 

 

Casey Anderson's latest mix was recorded live at Woobar, and is 45 minutes of groovy house:

 

 

A big chillout selection comes from CAFÉ DEL MAR IBIZA, as Hara's tune “Message To You” has been added as a bonus to the 20th Anniversary re-release of their influential first compilation. Hara’s more uptempo side, Arun R, also has a September playlist out.

 

 

There’s a Youtube Cypher afoot in the HK rapiverse, as a digital challenge is causing real mics to get passed. Jay.L seems the originator, with Heyo quickly in on the action, plus flows from Westdoor 西門, Kiki Tam, Quilla 月喬, and more. 8workshop is your source:

 

 

Jim Choi's hard at rework on both the funky “Power” and the soaring clap of “Bleeding Love.” Great to see a beatmaker go public with such diverse productions:

 

 

On “講男講女,” Kwokkin examines relationships, emphasising the issue of public abuse of men by women in Hong Kong. Over a rolling beat, the fast-paced lyrics are paired with humorous cartoons and Youtube clips:

 

 

Another nice Canto-hop track comes courtesy of Triple G, with production duties handled by Canvas. On Wild$tyle Records, “白日夢一場” is a bit mellow, with some nice swirling strings and keys:

 

 

Sneak Peak has begun a new monthly mixtape series, “Early Riser,” with appropriate morning music being featured in this collaboration with French webzine La Pause:

 

 

J-Hoon takes on a legend on his re-edit of “Juicy” in Atari-Transformer style. Low-bit beats ensue. His “Hands Up 舉高手2014 Remix” also got a shout-out from Indielicious on GFM.FM.

 

 

Sert asserts his drum ‘n’ bass side on his latest “Soul Healing Session,” which goes deeper into the jungle than the past few more liquid volumes.

 

 

In other dnb news, Con*Natural & Arkham’s set from Clockenflap 2013 has surfaced, just in time as this year’s artist announcements have begun, stirring up excitement for the 2014 festival!

 

 

In honour of the recent Italo-Disco night “Another Life III,” guest DJ Lyova prepared an exclusive mix:

 

 

Jeremy Cheung has a soulful new house mix out, quite literally since it was recorded on a Sunday at home rather than on the weekend at a club like his mixes regularly are:

 

 

SAiNT takes on Drake (or should it be DRaKE?), with his cover of “0 to 100.” Lyrics included as the veteran MC vents:

 

 

With the bass thwomping, DJ Seth Gutierrez drops his bootleg remix of Chainsmokers x John Newman. “Can you love me again?”

 

 

Nearing the limits of what the #HKMU will report upon, MC Jin's personal and heartfelt track “Chinese New Year,” is an interesting exploration of his Chinese-American experience. To be honest, in between brags and cliches, even he concedes “credibility gone” …

 

 

On the literary side of things, several features have popped up recently on HK underground artists. Ghost Style got a full write-up in the SCMP from Oliver Clasper, and for BOOM Magazine, the prolific writer also got dnb heavyweight DBridge on the phone in advance of his upcoming show with Magnetic Soul (for their 9th Anniversary). Finally, Sensi Lion took on some smoky topics in an interview for HK Magazine.

 

Macanese bassologist Achun has a fresh remix out, of A New Step Back’s “Love Evaporates.” A Beatport exclusive:

 

 

Through MacauBlacklist, the slow-beat on “唔成熟嘅細路” pairs quite nicely with the uptempo vocals from 七龍雞(7DC) Ft. LH & Monkey.

 

 

Bass label FTK has released a four-track EP from Macau artist Noise808, entitled ESCLTE. Expect sparse heaviness, with chopped up samples. The artist also just dropped a preview of “High’Point” which moves more into cinematic territory:

 

 

And what about yours truly The Groove Thief? Beyond typing myself towards the tunnel of carpal, I recently interviewed Suns of Dub and Masia One, and also released a politically-themed mixtape that CY has yet to get back to me about… doesn’t he read the newspaper?!

 

 

Keep making epic music Hong Kong. Keep making music epic Hong Kong. And remember to stand up for your rights.

 

Suns of Dub x Masia One: The Groove Thief Interview
 
Thanks to the kind efforts of Heavy Hongkong, I was given the opportunity to interview Jamaican roots revivalists Addis Pablo and Ras Jammy (of Suns of Dub), as well as eclectic Singaporean/Canadian vocalist Masia One, in advance of their upcoming show together this Saturday evening 06/09/14 at Basmati in Sheung Wan.
 
Basmati…? Dub music at an Indian restaurant in Hong Kong? Yes! For Heavy Hongkong, it’s a return to their original stomping grounds – since Sammy’s Kitchen used to occupy a space in the same building – while also showing the ingenuity successful underground music promotion in this city requires. Just like the artists’ approach to music, it’s all about employing the successes of the past to forge a new future:
 
Suns of Dub – who have risen to international tours, a Major Lazer-presented mixtape, and widespread acclaim within the past few years – are continuing the mission and musical legacy of Addis’ father, famed melodica player and producer Augustus Pablo.
 


 
Masia One has spent the past decade running her own record label, releasing several well-received albums, and collaborating with a wide variety of artists.
 

 
The Groove Thief: What are you enjoying most as you tour Asia?
 
Ras Jammy: We enjoy the people, their reactions and endless interests in our music and lifestyle. It is always good to be in a different place with different people of different cultures, and having the opportunity to experience a bit of their way of life and thinking. [So] performing has been good as the people love the vibes… [and] the food is a tour for itself!
 
TGT: What’re your thoughts on the underground Asian music scene? What is it lacking in contrast to North America, and how best can local promoters further development here?
 
Masia One: There is a heavy influence of Western music, but the underground scene is growing, innovating new sounds with multi-media expressions and producing a lot of tremendous musicians and producers.  For the underground Asian artists, I think it is important for us to always remember that music is not a competition, but an expression and chance to work together and learn from one another.  Often Asian environments are competitive.  I think the improvement can come from the side of promoters (especially club and mainstream promoters) to encourage original music over covers of Western music, and take on roles as taste makers - taking risks with innovative artists and challenging the public to discover new sounds and experiences.  There is a stereotype that Asian markets just want pop and mainstream music, but when we have presented something different, people have been very engaged and I have gained new followings as a result.
 
TGT: What is so special about the Rockers International [Augustus Pablo’s record label] sound? Why continue Rockers in 2014?
 
Addis Pablo: Rockers International has always been a sound representing the creative expression of a set of musicians, producers, engineers, and the people. It’s a sound of the people coming from many walks of life – at the same time appealing to people from many walks of life – through the use of instruments [and] vocals to express a Livity, or lifestyle, which is in harmony with nature. And [it is] a missionary works to express the message of Rastafari in 2014. It’s important to express this sound just like in any time because the works of Rockers International is to be spread across the four corners of the world, and in 2014 technology is more advanced then it was in the initial stages of the Rockers International sound being brought forward by my father and his fellow singers and players of instruments. So for me [and] my brother Ras Jammy to be representing these works of this solid foundation in this modern time plays a significant role in continuing the works. And, more importantly, introducing or showcasing these works to a young generation, which may have not got the chance to witness or experience the performances of the original Rockers. And for the older generation, who may have experienced the performances, it can be a nostalgic moment which could only be experienced through the sound which Suns of Dub is presenting in this time.
 
TGT: You’re known for your eclectic collaborations, including tracks with both former Red Hot Chili Peppers’ guitarist John Frusciante and bassologist ill.Gates. How does your sound and aesthetic connect with Suns of Dub?
 
Masia One: I think spending time as a songwriter in LA had me writing a lot of pop music.  Moving to Jamaica and connecting with the Suns of Dub has been a wonderful opportunity to make music that allows me to express ideas, messages and feelings from the heart again rather than what will be the best “hook” to sell the song.  My brother played me a lot of Peter Tosh, Toots & The Maytals, and Bob Marley when I was a kid - this is almost a reconnection with what made me first fall in love with music.
 
TGT: Obviously the legacy of Augustus Pablo looms large over the Suns of Dub project. What tracks would you recommend to someone less familiar with the crucial role he played in the development of roots reggae, particularly in regards to the “Far East” sound?
 
Addis Pablo: Well, I would recommend tracks such as: Java, East of the River Nile, and Cassava Piece.
 



 
TGT: Can you name a few artists that you love from Jamaica at the moment?
 
Ras Jammy: Many artists are now showing promise and there is a new wave of talent sweeping the place. We rate them all, basically, but for particular reasons we favor these: Hempress Sativa, Masicka, Jesse Royal, Dre Island, Exile di Brave, and many from the J.O.E collective (Micah Shemaiah, Chronixx, etc.).
 
Thanks so much to Addis Pablo, Masia One, and Ras Jammy for the Q&A session. Appreciated, and much respect. And Hong Kong - see you all at the show!
 
Suns of Dub x Masia One: The Groove Thief Interview

 

Thanks to the kind efforts of Heavy Hongkong, I was given the opportunity to interview Jamaican roots revivalists Addis Pablo and Ras Jammy (of Suns of Dub), as well as eclectic Singaporean/Canadian vocalist Masia One, in advance of their upcoming show together this Saturday evening 06/09/14 at Basmati in Sheung Wan.

 

Basmati…? Dub music at an Indian restaurant in Hong Kong? Yes! For Heavy Hongkong, it’s a return to their original stomping grounds – since Sammy’s Kitchen used to occupy a space in the same building – while also showing the ingenuity successful underground music promotion in this city requires. Just like the artists’ approach to music, it’s all about employing the successes of the past to forge a new future:

 

Suns of Dub – who have risen to international tours, a Major Lazer-presented mixtape, and widespread acclaim within the past few years – are continuing the mission and musical legacy of Addis’ father, famed melodica player and producer Augustus Pablo.

 

 

Masia One has spent the past decade running her own record label, releasing several well-received albums, and collaborating with a wide variety of artists.

 

 

The Groove Thief: What are you enjoying most as you tour Asia?

 

Ras Jammy: We enjoy the people, their reactions and endless interests in our music and lifestyle. It is always good to be in a different place with different people of different cultures, and having the opportunity to experience a bit of their way of life and thinking. [So] performing has been good as the people love the vibes… [and] the food is a tour for itself!

 

TGT: What’re your thoughts on the underground Asian music scene? What is it lacking in contrast to North America, and how best can local promoters further development here?

 

Masia One: There is a heavy influence of Western music, but the underground scene is growing, innovating new sounds with multi-media expressions and producing a lot of tremendous musicians and producers. For the underground Asian artists, I think it is important for us to always remember that music is not a competition, but an expression and chance to work together and learn from one another. Often Asian environments are competitive. I think the improvement can come from the side of promoters (especially club and mainstream promoters) to encourage original music over covers of Western music, and take on roles as taste makers - taking risks with innovative artists and challenging the public to discover new sounds and experiences. There is a stereotype that Asian markets just want pop and mainstream music, but when we have presented something different, people have been very engaged and I have gained new followings as a result.

 

TGT: What is so special about the Rockers International [Augustus Pablo’s record label] sound? Why continue Rockers in 2014?

 

Addis Pablo: Rockers International has always been a sound representing the creative expression of a set of musicians, producers, engineers, and the people. It’s a sound of the people coming from many walks of life – at the same time appealing to people from many walks of life – through the use of instruments [and] vocals to express a Livity, or lifestyle, which is in harmony with nature. And [it is] a missionary works to express the message of Rastafari in 2014. It’s important to express this sound just like in any time because the works of Rockers International is to be spread across the four corners of the world, and in 2014 technology is more advanced then it was in the initial stages of the Rockers International sound being brought forward by my father and his fellow singers and players of instruments. So for me [and] my brother Ras Jammy to be representing these works of this solid foundation in this modern time plays a significant role in continuing the works. And, more importantly, introducing or showcasing these works to a young generation, which may have not got the chance to witness or experience the performances of the original Rockers. And for the older generation, who may have experienced the performances, it can be a nostalgic moment which could only be experienced through the sound which Suns of Dub is presenting in this time.

 

TGT: You’re known for your eclectic collaborations, including tracks with both former Red Hot Chili Peppers’ guitarist John Frusciante and bassologist ill.Gates. How does your sound and aesthetic connect with Suns of Dub?

 

Masia One: I think spending time as a songwriter in LA had me writing a lot of pop music. Moving to Jamaica and connecting with the Suns of Dub has been a wonderful opportunity to make music that allows me to express ideas, messages and feelings from the heart again rather than what will be the best “hook” to sell the song. My brother played me a lot of Peter Tosh, Toots & The Maytals, and Bob Marley when I was a kid - this is almost a reconnection with what made me first fall in love with music.

 

TGT: Obviously the legacy of Augustus Pablo looms large over the Suns of Dub project. What tracks would you recommend to someone less familiar with the crucial role he played in the development of roots reggae, particularly in regards to the “Far East” sound?

 

Addis Pablo: Well, I would recommend tracks such as: Java, East of the River Nile, and Cassava Piece.

 

 

TGT: Can you name a few artists that you love from Jamaica at the moment?

 

Ras Jammy: Many artists are now showing promise and there is a new wave of talent sweeping the place. We rate them all, basically, but for particular reasons we favor these: Hempress Sativa, Masicka, Jesse Royal, Dre Island, Exile di Brave, and many from the J.O.E collective (Micah Shemaiah, Chronixx, etc.).

 

Thanks so much to Addis Pablo, Masia One, and Ras Jammy for the Q&A session. Appreciated, and much respect. And Hong Kong - see you all at the show!