*** [ dub / reggae / HK underground ] *** Hong Kong's Premiere Music Blog *** [ exclusive DJ mixes ] ***
Squeezing in a quick #HKMU before the Easter holiday, so any accidentally-overlooked Hong Kong music will appear next edition! Given that Pomegranate #2 is happening this very evening at oma, logic entails that Selekta Sev's [Paragon Sound System] previous Pomegranate mix - full of eclectic funky vibes - ought to get our journey started:
 

 
Cantonese reggae band Sensi Lion's recent collaboration with MC Heyo was fortunately recorded, albeit in two parts:
 


 
A Sensi Lion cover of Nirvana’s “Come As You Are,” entitled “Dub As You Jah” is also well-worth watching:
 

 
Nude_isco is venturing into the label game, so check out the new EP from Funk Hunk, along with an exclusive mix to mark the occasion:
 


 
Basil Tam is back in the mix game, with the groove-laden tech-house “Incarnation:”
 

 
Kendy Lam presents “My Life of Trance Vol. 4,” which may be the first true trance mix featured in the #HKMU. Uplifting with euphoric buildups:
 

 
Another genre debut comes from Sert's alter-ego PsySert, selecting a full-on uptempo psychedelic experience:
 

 
Deep in a far different sense, Kid Gweilo explores “Deep Fried House” in the fourth volume of his mixtape series
 

 
Composer Liam Gersh Nobu Tse has a new production, featuring a full primary school choir, called “Listening To The Rain:”
 

 
Also from Paragon Sound System, LëKSs has released a two-part ‘hypnotic African trip’ entitled “PataWahdaa:”
 


 
Ocean Lam has been featured by FRISKY Radio, in a segment called FRISKY Loves China. Check out the interview now, and her mix, along with one from Jeremy Cheung, will be airing April 26 and available for download shortly thereafter. 
 
The Italian party vibes continue (remember JayMe’s mix from last #HKMU?) as Roy Malig’s “Mello-Italo” mix from the same night has also emerged:
 

 
Finally, the ever-prolific Eazybeatz has a new video out for “Pinoy Wit Attitude:”
 

 
Well there we have it folks! Turn the bass up and enjoy all the fine efforts from the Hong Kong underground… as always, remember you can check out The Groove Thief over on Facebook for more regular music posts… and if you haven’t listed already, make sure to check out my latest effort, a previously-unreleased radio mix for the sadly-now-defunct reggae/ska show “The Saturday Skank" on RTHK Radio 3:
 

 
Squeezing in a quick #HKMU before the Easter holiday, so any accidentally-overlooked Hong Kong music will appear next edition! Given that Pomegranate #2 is happening this very evening at oma, logic entails that Selekta Sev's [Paragon Sound System] previous Pomegranate mix - full of eclectic funky vibes - ought to get our journey started:

 

 

Cantonese reggae band Sensi Lion's recent collaboration with MC Heyo was fortunately recorded, albeit in two parts:

 

 

A Sensi Lion cover of Nirvana’s “Come As You Are,” entitled “Dub As You Jah” is also well-worth watching:

 

 

Nude_isco is venturing into the label game, so check out the new EP from Funk Hunk, along with an exclusive mix to mark the occasion:

 

 

Basil Tam is back in the mix game, with the groove-laden tech-house “Incarnation:”

 

 

Kendy Lam presents “My Life of Trance Vol. 4,” which may be the first true trance mix featured in the #HKMU. Uplifting with euphoric buildups:

 

 

Another genre debut comes from Sert's alter-ego PsySert, selecting a full-on uptempo psychedelic experience:

 

 

Deep in a far different sense, Kid Gweilo explores “Deep Fried House” in the fourth volume of his mixtape series

 

 

Composer Liam Gersh Nobu Tse has a new production, featuring a full primary school choir, called “Listening To The Rain:”

 

 

Also from Paragon Sound System, LëKSs has released a two-part ‘hypnotic African trip’ entitled “PataWahdaa:”

 

 

Ocean Lam has been featured by FRISKY Radio, in a segment called FRISKY Loves China. Check out the interview now, and her mix, along with one from Jeremy Cheung, will be airing April 26 and available for download shortly thereafter.

 

The Italian party vibes continue (remember JayMe’s mix from last #HKMU?) as Roy Malig’s “Mello-Italo” mix from the same night has also emerged:

 

 

Finally, the ever-prolific Eazybeatz has a new video out for “Pinoy Wit Attitude:”

 

 

Well there we have it folks! Turn the bass up and enjoy all the fine efforts from the Hong Kong underground… as always, remember you can check out The Groove Thief over on Facebook for more regular music posts… and if you haven’t listed already, make sure to check out my latest effort, a previously-unreleased radio mix for the sadly-now-defunct reggae/ska show “The Saturday Skank" on RTHK Radio 3:

 

 

Perhaps the artwork for Stone By Stone, the new album from tight eclectic instrumental funksters Ikebe Shakedown, sums things up appropriately: between the vintage overlay and the barren-yet-inspiring desert-scape, these stones clearly have soul. Opener “The Offering” sets the tone, as horns - led by the sax - ride a groove controlled by the strong rhythm section and slightly skanking guitar. A live video has just been released as well:
 

 
The title track takes thing into deeper and more melancholic territory, with the blasting brass reigned in before hitting free jazz territory. “The Beast” takes a steady afrobeat groove, led by the drums but empowered by the bass, and inspires dancing feet courtesy of an entrancing melody. Often called cinematic soul, ultimately this is beyond genre, a subtle display of impressive musicianship that is aware of the pillars of the past and the potential of the future.
 
“By Hook Or By Crook” may soar, but “Rio Grande” seems to have most directly inspired the album art, recalling Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass in all the best ways. “Last Stand” pushes the tempo back up, then rides off into the sunset; “Cover Your Tracks” then, is perhaps the most poignant track of all, as the seven-piece slip into a smoky late-night vibe before disappearing whence they came. “Chosen Path” follows a similar formula - not in a derivative way, just in the sense of an evolving band digging deeper into their own sound. The closing pair of tracks, “The Illusion,” and “Dram,” begin hauntingly and invitingly, respectively, as the former is driven by a powerful walking bass-line and the latter, while slightly more reserved, is opened up to allow the reverberating guitar to end things in psychedelic style. Ten strong tracks, definitely intended to be listened to in succession:
 
Stone By Stone by Ikebe Shakedown
 
A timely remix comes from Beat Gates, who takes on “No Name Bar” from Ikebe Shakedown’s self-titled album. Emphasizing the low-end via a slightly thunderous clap, the original’s spirit shines through as it confidently enters beat-tape territory. Free download: 
 

 
In need of more Ikebe Shakedown? Fair enough. Their stellar debut EP Hard Steppin’ is available here:
 
Ikebe Shakedown - Hard Steppin’ EP (Debut) by Ikebe Shakedown
 
And “Dead Wrong” is a cool mashup with the Notorious BIG:
 

 
Perhaps the artwork for Stone By Stone, the new album from tight eclectic instrumental funksters Ikebe Shakedown, sums things up appropriately: between the vintage overlay and the barren-yet-inspiring desert-scape, these stones clearly have soul. Opener “The Offering” sets the tone, as horns - led by the sax - ride a groove controlled by the strong rhythm section and slightly skanking guitar. A live video has just been released as well:

 

 

The title track takes thing into deeper and more melancholic territory, with the blasting brass reigned in before hitting free jazz territory. “The Beast” takes a steady afrobeat groove, led by the drums but empowered by the bass, and inspires dancing feet courtesy of an entrancing melody. Often called cinematic soul, ultimately this is beyond genre, a subtle display of impressive musicianship that is aware of the pillars of the past and the potential of the future.

 

“By Hook Or By Crook” may soar, but “Rio Grande” seems to have most directly inspired the album art, recalling Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass in all the best ways. “Last Stand” pushes the tempo back up, then rides off into the sunset; “Cover Your Tracks” then, is perhaps the most poignant track of all, as the seven-piece slip into a smoky late-night vibe before disappearing whence they came. “Chosen Path” follows a similar formula - not in a derivative way, just in the sense of an evolving band digging deeper into their own sound. The closing pair of tracks, “The Illusion,” and “Dram,” begin hauntingly and invitingly, respectively, as the former is driven by a powerful walking bass-line and the latter, while slightly more reserved, is opened up to allow the reverberating guitar to end things in psychedelic style. Ten strong tracks, definitely intended to be listened to in succession:

 

 

A timely remix comes from Beat Gates, who takes on “No Name Bar” from Ikebe Shakedown’s self-titled album. Emphasizing the low-end via a slightly thunderous clap, the original’s spirit shines through as it confidently enters beat-tape territory. Free download:

 

 

In need of more Ikebe Shakedown? Fair enough. Their stellar debut EP Hard Steppin’ is available here:

 

Ikebe Shakedown - Hard Steppin’ EP (Debut) by Ikebe Shakedown

 

And “Dead Wrong” is a cool mashup with the Notorious BIG:

 

 

An exciting pairing, Prince Fatty Versus Mungo’s Hi Fi takes all the right aspects of quality reggae - inspiring vocals, thick basslines, catchy grooves - and adds in the touch of talented remixers from opposite ends of the reggae sphere. For the first half of this ten-track, Prince Fatty takes on some iconic Mungo’s Hi Fi productions, before the Scottish soundsystem returns the favor for the final five tunes. Opening in inspired fashion, “Herbalist” is indeed a smoker’s anthem, with Top Cat’s fast-paced smoky serenade receiving some lush effects; however, the echo comes further into play on “Scrub A Dub Style,” featuring the late great Sugar Minott, which comes with an appropriately bright and invigorating animated video:
 

 
Soom T is next pon di mic, asking “Did You Really Know” as she inspires the dancehall massive. Prince Fatty lets the heart and soul of the original tune remain, although with a truly funky extended breakdown, some wicked phaser effects, and great vibes throughout. “Under Arrest” takes on Babylon directly, issuing a clear warning to those not ready to peacefully skank all night long: ‘better run now!’ Next up comes the uptempo “Divorce A L’Italienne,” which has an obvious southern-European influence in both title and style, as the horns run the melody along with a nice vocal turn from Marina P. Throughout Prince Fatty employs his trademark rich, vintage-influenced, tone and touch.
 
Hollie Cook’s “Sugarwater,” a heavy digital breakdown surrounded by an almost ethereal poppy vocal, is up first as Mungo’s Hi Fi takes the controls. “Dry Your Tears,” in contrast, is nearly sorrowful as Winston Francis’ rocksteady style meshes nicely with Mungo’s future-forward production. Next Horseman - who also appears on both Hollie Cook tracks - voices “Horsemove” predominately in a fast ragga style atop a very solid groove. Then it’s “Say What You’re Saying,” which pairs some deep bass with an 80s riddim before George Dekker’s sweet singjay chorus appears, like a reggae party in a Nintendo. As Hollie Cook returns, for the ‘drip-drop’ of album-ending “For Me You Are,” this clash ends as it began: in style.
 
Available in CD, vinyl, and digital formats.
 

 
An exciting pairing, Prince Fatty Versus Mungo’s Hi Fi takes all the right aspects of quality reggae - inspiring vocals, thick basslines, catchy grooves - and adds in the touch of talented remixers from opposite ends of the reggae sphere. For the first half of this ten-track, Prince Fatty takes on some iconic Mungo’s Hi Fi productions, before the Scottish soundsystem returns the favor for the final five tunes. Opening in inspired fashion, “Herbalist” is indeed a smoker’s anthem, with Top Cat’s fast-paced smoky serenade receiving some lush effects; however, the echo comes further into play on “Scrub A Dub Style,” featuring the late great Sugar Minott, which comes with an appropriately bright and invigorating animated video:

 

 

Soom T is next pon di mic, asking “Did You Really Know” as she inspires the dancehall massive. Prince Fatty lets the heart and soul of the original tune remain, although with a truly funky extended breakdown, some wicked phaser effects, and great vibes throughout. “Under Arrest” takes on Babylon directly, issuing a clear warning to those not ready to peacefully skank all night long: ‘better run now!’ Next up comes the uptempo “Divorce A L’Italienne,” which has an obvious southern-European influence in both title and style, as the horns run the melody along with a nice vocal turn from Marina P. Throughout Prince Fatty employs his trademark rich, vintage-influenced, tone and touch.

 

Hollie Cook’s “Sugarwater,” a heavy digital breakdown surrounded by an almost ethereal poppy vocal, is up first as Mungo’s Hi Fi takes the controls. “Dry Your Tears,” in contrast, is nearly sorrowful as Winston Francis’ rocksteady style meshes nicely with Mungo’s future-forward production. Next Horseman - who also appears on both Hollie Cook tracks - voices “Horsemove” predominately in a fast ragga style atop a very solid groove. Then it’s “Say What You’re Saying,” which pairs some deep bass with an 80s riddim before George Dekker’s sweet singjay chorus appears, like a reggae party in a Nintendo. As Hollie Cook returns, for the ‘drip-drop’ of album-ending “For Me You Are,” this clash ends as it began: in style.

 

Available in CD, vinyl, and digital formats.