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Brazen may be exactly that, by properly emphasizing the dub in dubstep and the bassy depths of low-end theory on True Dub With A Step. The opening horns of “Jah Bless” make it clear that reggae influences will appear as well, but this album is more about bass-lines and whatever that dubstep ‘whomp’ should be called. “Freedom” combines a meditative vocal sample with a sparse drum, before the machines attack alongside a keyboard melody. The juxtaposition of sounds continues on the revelatory “Roots,” which is slow and brooding with minor keys and unusual instrumentation… and then comes the massive “Ganja Farmer.” More re-imagining than remix, it’s effects-laden vocals atop a dark future dub groove. “Is This Dub” pinches from Bob Marley, adding a thick growling bass beneath the echoed vocal sample to a track that at times sounds like a funeral dirge for a rasta robot. “Laysir” turns the BPM up, initially toying with a sample before dropping the bass in increasing layers throughout the track. “Pull Up On This” leans further into dubstep, before closer “Tribe By Fire” (feat. Jah Rocker) ambles back into heavy future skankin’ territory. This is a forward-thinking release, mixing the sounds of modern bass music with the theory and approach of classic dub. Free download via Soundcloud:

Brazen may be exactly that, by properly emphasizing the dub in dubstep and the bassy depths of low-end theory on True Dub With A Step. The opening horns of “Jah Bless” make it clear that reggae influences will appear as well, but this album is more about bass-lines and whatever that dubstep ‘whomp’ should be called. “Freedom” combines a meditative vocal sample with a sparse drum, before the machines attack alongside a keyboard melody. The juxtaposition of sounds continues on the revelatory “Roots,” which is slow and brooding with minor keys and unusual instrumentation… and then comes the massive “Ganja Farmer.” More re-imagining than remix, it’s effects-laden vocals atop a dark future dub groove. “Is This Dub” pinches from Bob Marley, adding a thick growling bass beneath the echoed vocal sample to a track that at times sounds like a funeral dirge for a rasta robot. “Laysir” turns the BPM up, initially toying with a sample before dropping the bass in increasing layers throughout the track. “Pull Up On This” leans further into dubstep, before closer “Tribe By Fire” (feat. Jah Rocker) ambles back into heavy future skankin’ territory. This is a forward-thinking release, mixing the sounds of modern bass music with the theory and approach of classic dub. Free download via Soundcloud:

Jstar is releasing a cleverly-titled compilation of his bass-laden remixes and dubs later this month on vinyl. Already streamable, these are some heavy tunes covering a wide spectrum of low-end theories. Remixes: from the dubbed-out hip-hop of Dj Vadim’s “Watch That Sound” (feat. Emo) to the horn-laden reggae-hop of “Ya Ya” from The Empty Heads feat. MC Sirreal to the mellow smoker vibes of “Ten Feet Tall” by Mr Dero / Farina Miss. Jstar takes Madness into late-night dubby-electro, Dub Terminator feat. Ras Stone into bad man territory on “Bad Mind,” and - the definite standout - Capitol 1212 feat. “Oh me, oh my this is Tenor Fly” into the land of mystical grooves, complete with an epic vocal-led break. The instrumentals aren’t exactly slouching, The Unlimiters’ “Loophole” ventures into psychedelia yet mantains a dub aesthetic, ”Fish Finger Tentacle Dub” builds up to some glitchy grooves while “Regulate Rock (Jstar Dub)” ends the album on a super funky note that feels restrained at four-and-a-half minutes. Jstar is at a crucial crossroads of dub, reggae, and bass, where a myriad of influences can be blended together to still produce a cohesive track, and here, a surprisingly cohesive album:
<a href=”http://jstarmusic.bandcamp.com/album/licensed-plates-2” data-mce-href=”http://jstarmusic.bandcamp.com/album/licensed-plates-2”>Licensed Plates by Jstar</a>

Jstar is releasing a cleverly-titled compilation of his bass-laden remixes and dubs later this month on vinyl. Already streamable, these are some heavy tunes covering a wide spectrum of low-end theories. Remixes: from the dubbed-out hip-hop of Dj Vadim’s “Watch That Sound” (feat. Emo) to the horn-laden reggae-hop of “Ya Ya” from The Empty Heads feat. MC Sirreal to the mellow smoker vibes of “Ten Feet Tall” by Mr Dero / Farina Miss. Jstar takes Madness into late-night dubby-electro, Dub Terminator feat. Ras Stone into bad man territory on “Bad Mind,” and - the definite standout - Capitol 1212 feat. “Oh me, oh my this is Tenor Fly” into the land of mystical grooves, complete with an epic vocal-led break. The instrumentals aren’t exactly slouching, The Unlimiters’ “Loophole” ventures into psychedelia yet mantains a dub aesthetic, ”Fish Finger Tentacle Dub” builds up to some glitchy grooves while “Regulate Rock (Jstar Dub)” ends the album on a super funky note that feels restrained at four-and-a-half minutes. Jstar is at a crucial crossroads of dub, reggae, and bass, where a myriad of influences can be blended together to still produce a cohesive track, and here, a surprisingly cohesive album:

Dub Breakah thankfully hasn’t literally done that to dub music, instead producing a slew of strong riddims as well as some fierce tracks. The “Beast Riddim” is definitely my favorite: the skanking guitar intro leads to a nice and heavy track, which as “Babylonbuster (Dub Breakah Remix), is pushed towards anthem status with the ruff vocal reminiscent of Buju Banton. “Roots Riddim,” the most recent production, features some smooth horns and a mellow breakdown. “Tribulations” is another great track, some true reggae dub that sounds hazy in all the right ways while vocal samples echo occasionally alongside a relentless beat. “Jah Freedom Riddim” is another solid effort, and there’s more glorious reggae dub tracks available up on Soundcloud.

Dub Breakah thankfully hasn’t literally done that to dub music, instead producing a slew of strong riddims as well as some fierce tracks. The “Beast Riddim” is definitely my favorite: the skanking guitar intro leads to a nice and heavy track, which as “Babylonbuster (Dub Breakah Remix), is pushed towards anthem status with the ruff vocal reminiscent of Buju Banton. “Roots Riddim,” the most recent production, features some smooth horns and a mellow breakdown. “Tribulations” is another great track, some true reggae dub that sounds hazy in all the right ways while vocal samples echo occasionally alongside a relentless beat. “Jah Freedom Riddim” is another solid effort, and there’s more glorious reggae dub tracks available up on Soundcloud.