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An exciting pairing, Prince Fatty Versus Mungo’s Hi Fi takes all the right aspects of quality reggae - inspiring vocals, thick basslines, catchy grooves - and adds in the touch of talented remixers from opposite ends of the reggae sphere. For the first half of this ten-track, Prince Fatty takes on some iconic Mungo’s Hi Fi productions, before the Scottish soundsystem returns the favor for the final five tunes. Opening in inspired fashion, “Herbalist” is indeed a smoker’s anthem, with Top Cat’s fast-paced smoky serenade receiving some lush effects; however, the echo comes further into play on “Scrub A Dub Style,” featuring the late great Sugar Minott, which comes with an appropriately bright and invigorating animated video:
 

 
Soom T is next pon di mic, asking “Did You Really Know” as she inspires the dancehall massive. Prince Fatty lets the heart and soul of the original tune remain, although with a truly funky extended breakdown, some wicked phaser effects, and great vibes throughout. “Under Arrest” takes on Babylon directly, issuing a clear warning to those not ready to peacefully skank all night long: ‘better run now!’ Next up comes the uptempo “Divorce A L’Italienne,” which has an obvious southern-European influence in both title and style, as the horns run the melody along with a nice vocal turn from Marina P. Throughout Prince Fatty employs his trademark rich, vintage-influenced, tone and touch.
 
Hollie Cook’s “Sugarwater,” a heavy digital breakdown surrounded by an almost ethereal poppy vocal, is up first as Mungo’s Hi Fi takes the controls. “Dry Your Tears,” in contrast, is nearly sorrowful as Winston Francis’ rocksteady style meshes nicely with Mungo’s future-forward production. Next Horseman - who also appears on both Hollie Cook tracks - voices “Horsemove” predominately in a fast ragga style atop a very solid groove. Then it’s “Say What You’re Saying,” which pairs some deep bass with an 80s riddim before George Dekker’s sweet singjay chorus appears, like a reggae party in a Nintendo. As Hollie Cook returns, for the ‘drip-drop’ of album-ending “For Me You Are,” this clash ends as it began: in style.
 
Available in CD, vinyl, and digital formats.
 

 
An exciting pairing, Prince Fatty Versus Mungo’s Hi Fi takes all the right aspects of quality reggae - inspiring vocals, thick basslines, catchy grooves - and adds in the touch of talented remixers from opposite ends of the reggae sphere. For the first half of this ten-track, Prince Fatty takes on some iconic Mungo’s Hi Fi productions, before the Scottish soundsystem returns the favor for the final five tunes. Opening in inspired fashion, “Herbalist” is indeed a smoker’s anthem, with Top Cat’s fast-paced smoky serenade receiving some lush effects; however, the echo comes further into play on “Scrub A Dub Style,” featuring the late great Sugar Minott, which comes with an appropriately bright and invigorating animated video:

 

 

Soom T is next pon di mic, asking “Did You Really Know” as she inspires the dancehall massive. Prince Fatty lets the heart and soul of the original tune remain, although with a truly funky extended breakdown, some wicked phaser effects, and great vibes throughout. “Under Arrest” takes on Babylon directly, issuing a clear warning to those not ready to peacefully skank all night long: ‘better run now!’ Next up comes the uptempo “Divorce A L’Italienne,” which has an obvious southern-European influence in both title and style, as the horns run the melody along with a nice vocal turn from Marina P. Throughout Prince Fatty employs his trademark rich, vintage-influenced, tone and touch.

 

Hollie Cook’s “Sugarwater,” a heavy digital breakdown surrounded by an almost ethereal poppy vocal, is up first as Mungo’s Hi Fi takes the controls. “Dry Your Tears,” in contrast, is nearly sorrowful as Winston Francis’ rocksteady style meshes nicely with Mungo’s future-forward production. Next Horseman - who also appears on both Hollie Cook tracks - voices “Horsemove” predominately in a fast ragga style atop a very solid groove. Then it’s “Say What You’re Saying,” which pairs some deep bass with an 80s riddim before George Dekker’s sweet singjay chorus appears, like a reggae party in a Nintendo. As Hollie Cook returns, for the ‘drip-drop’ of album-ending “For Me You Are,” this clash ends as it began: in style.

 

Available in CD, vinyl, and digital formats.

 

 

YT’s album Revolution Time explodes with fierce digital dancehall riddims, upon which the MC keeps it irie with talented and timely vocals. While guests Mungo’s Hi Fi, Solo Banton, and Mr. Williamz alone make this worth a listen, YT holds his own on the microphone on these strong tracks. Lead (and downloadable) single “Forward To Reality" is an indictment of modern times, "World News" gives the Dutty Diseases riddim an excellent workout, while closer "Heathen Agenda" is smooth with an upbeat vibe - balance is the key here, as YT includes a lot of different styles within the reggae-sphere. A nice mixtape from Ashanti Yard is available as well…

YT’s album Revolution Time explodes with fierce digital dancehall riddims, upon which the MC keeps it irie with talented and timely vocals. While guests Mungo’s Hi Fi, Solo Banton, and Mr. Williamz alone make this worth a listen, YT holds his own on the microphone on these strong tracks. Lead (and downloadable) single “Forward To Reality" is an indictment of modern times, "World News" gives the Dutty Diseases riddim an excellent workout, while closer "Heathen Agenda" is smooth with an upbeat vibe - balance is the key here, as YT includes a lot of different styles within the reggae-sphere. A nice mixtape from Ashanti Yard is available as well…

Jahtari is rewriting digital dub history once again with the latest installment of their powerful Jahtarian Dubbers series, Vol. 3.  Digital is available on Juno, and physical formats are available via Jahtari directly.  Prepare your minds for deep dubs from label regulars John Frum, Rootah, Soom T, El Fata, Ranking Levy, the always mysterious Jahtari Riddim Force, and of course prolific label boss Disrupt.  Mungo’s Hi Fi, Mikey Murka and Maffi drop some digi-heat as well, though the biggest surprise here must be Lee Perry’s appearance.  This compilation is full of dubbed-out bass:  John Frum unleashes the echoplex on a twisting melody-line, Monkey Marc is more dance-floor focused while still meandering through the dubasphere, and Soom T’s vocals are on point per usual.
  
More complete tracks are available on Jahtari’s Youtube channel.

Jahtari is rewriting digital dub history once again with the latest installment of their powerful Jahtarian Dubbers series, Vol. 3.  Digital is available on Juno, and physical formats are available via Jahtari directly.  Prepare your minds for deep dubs from label regulars John Frum, Rootah, Soom T, El Fata, Ranking Levy, the always mysterious Jahtari Riddim Force, and of course prolific label boss Disrupt.  Mungo’s Hi Fi, Mikey Murka and Maffi drop some digi-heat as well, though the biggest surprise here must be Lee Perry’s appearance.  This compilation is full of dubbed-out bass:  John Frum unleashes the echoplex on a twisting melody-line, Monkey Marc is more dance-floor focused while still meandering through the dubasphere, and Soom T’s vocals are on point per usual.

More complete tracks are available on Jahtari’s Youtube channel.