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Suns of Dub x Masia One: The Groove Thief Interview
 
Thanks to the kind efforts of Heavy Hongkong, I was given the opportunity to interview Jamaican roots revivalists Addis Pablo and Ras Jammy (of Suns of Dub), as well as eclectic Singaporean/Canadian vocalist Masia One, in advance of their upcoming show together this Saturday evening 06/09/14 at Basmati in Sheung Wan.
 
Basmati…? Dub music at an Indian restaurant in Hong Kong? Yes! For Heavy Hongkong, it’s a return to their original stomping grounds – since Sammy’s Kitchen used to occupy a space in the same building – while also showing the ingenuity successful underground music promotion in this city requires. Just like the artists’ approach to music, it’s all about employing the successes of the past to forge a new future:
 
Suns of Dub – who have risen to international tours, a Major Lazer-presented mixtape, and widespread acclaim within the past few years – are continuing the mission and musical legacy of Addis’ father, famed melodica player and producer Augustus Pablo.
 


 
Masia One has spent the past decade running her own record label, releasing several well-received albums, and collaborating with a wide variety of artists.
 

 
The Groove Thief: What are you enjoying most as you tour Asia?
 
Ras Jammy: We enjoy the people, their reactions and endless interests in our music and lifestyle. It is always good to be in a different place with different people of different cultures, and having the opportunity to experience a bit of their way of life and thinking. [So] performing has been good as the people love the vibes… [and] the food is a tour for itself!
 
TGT: What’re your thoughts on the underground Asian music scene? What is it lacking in contrast to North America, and how best can local promoters further development here?
 
Masia One: There is a heavy influence of Western music, but the underground scene is growing, innovating new sounds with multi-media expressions and producing a lot of tremendous musicians and producers.  For the underground Asian artists, I think it is important for us to always remember that music is not a competition, but an expression and chance to work together and learn from one another.  Often Asian environments are competitive.  I think the improvement can come from the side of promoters (especially club and mainstream promoters) to encourage original music over covers of Western music, and take on roles as taste makers - taking risks with innovative artists and challenging the public to discover new sounds and experiences.  There is a stereotype that Asian markets just want pop and mainstream music, but when we have presented something different, people have been very engaged and I have gained new followings as a result.
 
TGT: What is so special about the Rockers International [Augustus Pablo’s record label] sound? Why continue Rockers in 2014?
 
Addis Pablo: Rockers International has always been a sound representing the creative expression of a set of musicians, producers, engineers, and the people. It’s a sound of the people coming from many walks of life – at the same time appealing to people from many walks of life – through the use of instruments [and] vocals to express a Livity, or lifestyle, which is in harmony with nature. And [it is] a missionary works to express the message of Rastafari in 2014. It’s important to express this sound just like in any time because the works of Rockers International is to be spread across the four corners of the world, and in 2014 technology is more advanced then it was in the initial stages of the Rockers International sound being brought forward by my father and his fellow singers and players of instruments. So for me [and] my brother Ras Jammy to be representing these works of this solid foundation in this modern time plays a significant role in continuing the works. And, more importantly, introducing or showcasing these works to a young generation, which may have not got the chance to witness or experience the performances of the original Rockers. And for the older generation, who may have experienced the performances, it can be a nostalgic moment which could only be experienced through the sound which Suns of Dub is presenting in this time.
 
TGT: You’re known for your eclectic collaborations, including tracks with both former Red Hot Chili Peppers’ guitarist John Frusciante and bassologist ill.Gates. How does your sound and aesthetic connect with Suns of Dub?
 
Masia One: I think spending time as a songwriter in LA had me writing a lot of pop music.  Moving to Jamaica and connecting with the Suns of Dub has been a wonderful opportunity to make music that allows me to express ideas, messages and feelings from the heart again rather than what will be the best “hook” to sell the song.  My brother played me a lot of Peter Tosh, Toots & The Maytals, and Bob Marley when I was a kid - this is almost a reconnection with what made me first fall in love with music.
 
TGT: Obviously the legacy of Augustus Pablo looms large over the Suns of Dub project. What tracks would you recommend to someone less familiar with the crucial role he played in the development of roots reggae, particularly in regards to the “Far East” sound?
 
Addis Pablo: Well, I would recommend tracks such as: Java, East of the River Nile, and Cassava Piece.
 



 
TGT: Can you name a few artists that you love from Jamaica at the moment?
 
Ras Jammy: Many artists are now showing promise and there is a new wave of talent sweeping the place. We rate them all, basically, but for particular reasons we favor these: Hempress Sativa, Masicka, Jesse Royal, Dre Island, Exile di Brave, and many from the J.O.E collective (Micah Shemaiah, Chronixx, etc.).
 
Thanks so much to Addis Pablo, Masia One, and Ras Jammy for the Q&A session. Appreciated, and much respect. And Hong Kong - see you all at the show!
 
Suns of Dub x Masia One: The Groove Thief Interview

 

Thanks to the kind efforts of Heavy Hongkong, I was given the opportunity to interview Jamaican roots revivalists Addis Pablo and Ras Jammy (of Suns of Dub), as well as eclectic Singaporean/Canadian vocalist Masia One, in advance of their upcoming show together this Saturday evening 06/09/14 at Basmati in Sheung Wan.

 

Basmati…? Dub music at an Indian restaurant in Hong Kong? Yes! For Heavy Hongkong, it’s a return to their original stomping grounds – since Sammy’s Kitchen used to occupy a space in the same building – while also showing the ingenuity successful underground music promotion in this city requires. Just like the artists’ approach to music, it’s all about employing the successes of the past to forge a new future:

 

Suns of Dub – who have risen to international tours, a Major Lazer-presented mixtape, and widespread acclaim within the past few years – are continuing the mission and musical legacy of Addis’ father, famed melodica player and producer Augustus Pablo.

 

 

Masia One has spent the past decade running her own record label, releasing several well-received albums, and collaborating with a wide variety of artists.

 

 

The Groove Thief: What are you enjoying most as you tour Asia?

 

Ras Jammy: We enjoy the people, their reactions and endless interests in our music and lifestyle. It is always good to be in a different place with different people of different cultures, and having the opportunity to experience a bit of their way of life and thinking. [So] performing has been good as the people love the vibes… [and] the food is a tour for itself!

 

TGT: What’re your thoughts on the underground Asian music scene? What is it lacking in contrast to North America, and how best can local promoters further development here?

 

Masia One: There is a heavy influence of Western music, but the underground scene is growing, innovating new sounds with multi-media expressions and producing a lot of tremendous musicians and producers. For the underground Asian artists, I think it is important for us to always remember that music is not a competition, but an expression and chance to work together and learn from one another. Often Asian environments are competitive. I think the improvement can come from the side of promoters (especially club and mainstream promoters) to encourage original music over covers of Western music, and take on roles as taste makers - taking risks with innovative artists and challenging the public to discover new sounds and experiences. There is a stereotype that Asian markets just want pop and mainstream music, but when we have presented something different, people have been very engaged and I have gained new followings as a result.

 

TGT: What is so special about the Rockers International [Augustus Pablo’s record label] sound? Why continue Rockers in 2014?

 

Addis Pablo: Rockers International has always been a sound representing the creative expression of a set of musicians, producers, engineers, and the people. It’s a sound of the people coming from many walks of life – at the same time appealing to people from many walks of life – through the use of instruments [and] vocals to express a Livity, or lifestyle, which is in harmony with nature. And [it is] a missionary works to express the message of Rastafari in 2014. It’s important to express this sound just like in any time because the works of Rockers International is to be spread across the four corners of the world, and in 2014 technology is more advanced then it was in the initial stages of the Rockers International sound being brought forward by my father and his fellow singers and players of instruments. So for me [and] my brother Ras Jammy to be representing these works of this solid foundation in this modern time plays a significant role in continuing the works. And, more importantly, introducing or showcasing these works to a young generation, which may have not got the chance to witness or experience the performances of the original Rockers. And for the older generation, who may have experienced the performances, it can be a nostalgic moment which could only be experienced through the sound which Suns of Dub is presenting in this time.

 

TGT: You’re known for your eclectic collaborations, including tracks with both former Red Hot Chili Peppers’ guitarist John Frusciante and bassologist ill.Gates. How does your sound and aesthetic connect with Suns of Dub?

 

Masia One: I think spending time as a songwriter in LA had me writing a lot of pop music. Moving to Jamaica and connecting with the Suns of Dub has been a wonderful opportunity to make music that allows me to express ideas, messages and feelings from the heart again rather than what will be the best “hook” to sell the song. My brother played me a lot of Peter Tosh, Toots & The Maytals, and Bob Marley when I was a kid - this is almost a reconnection with what made me first fall in love with music.

 

TGT: Obviously the legacy of Augustus Pablo looms large over the Suns of Dub project. What tracks would you recommend to someone less familiar with the crucial role he played in the development of roots reggae, particularly in regards to the “Far East” sound?

 

Addis Pablo: Well, I would recommend tracks such as: Java, East of the River Nile, and Cassava Piece.

 

 

TGT: Can you name a few artists that you love from Jamaica at the moment?

 

Ras Jammy: Many artists are now showing promise and there is a new wave of talent sweeping the place. We rate them all, basically, but for particular reasons we favor these: Hempress Sativa, Masicka, Jesse Royal, Dre Island, Exile di Brave, and many from the J.O.E collective (Micah Shemaiah, Chronixx, etc.).

 

Thanks so much to Addis Pablo, Masia One, and Ras Jammy for the Q&A session. Appreciated, and much respect. And Hong Kong - see you all at the show!

 

The clean and crisp productions, along with a mixture of analog and digital instrumentation, certainly do not belie the power of the melodica in the hands of Art-X; yes, Augustus Pablo is being channeled here - Toy Story, it is safe to assume, is more Jamaica than Pixar - with the talented soloist joined by a bevy of experienced underground dub producers, most notably Lab Frequency, Manu Digital, Ondubground, and Panda Dub. 
Opener “Balls & Speed” (feat. Roots Raid) has a hint of analog crackle before the tight drums and keys spill nicely into a soulful melodica hook, teased by sound effects. “Dub Woman” prioritizes a funky groove, with a wordless vocal sample kept short. The epic intro of “Pull It Up” paves the way for a reserved electro steppers tune from Dawa Hifi; “Musical Town” sounds like Mungo’s Hi Fi’s Ruff Mi Tuff Riddim except that the expected rough vocals are replaced by a smooth blow-organ melody. That’s the key here: Art-X is clearly cultivating a myriad of sounds, but by interweaving the standout melodica wisely, what could have easily been vintage nostalgia is instead comfortable yet inventive - 70s Jamaican vibes with 40 years of outernational influence. 
“Dub That” is a solid jam with Ondubground, echoes and reverb in all the right places; Panda Dub takes the controls on “Cotton” with similarly strong results. “Swimming Dub” brings thicker bass into the mix, a trend logically continued on “Heavy Blow” (feat. Hatman). Then “Inity” takes things to a deeper state of consciousness, with Miniman providing a sonic canvas worthy of the classic roots era. “Political War” is more upbeat steppers, with nary a pause, setting up the brassy closer “Radical Plan” by Brain Damage, which is heavy with some massive echo. A lot of standout tracks here, free download via Original Dub Gathering.
 
The clean and crisp productions, along with a mixture of analog and digital instrumentation, certainly do not belie the power of the melodica in the hands of Art-X; yes, Augustus Pablo is being channeled here - Toy Story, it is safe to assume, is more Jamaica than Pixar - with the talented soloist joined by a bevy of experienced underground dub producers, most notably Lab Frequency, Manu Digital, Ondubground, and Panda Dub.

 

Opener “Balls & Speed” (feat. Roots Raid) has a hint of analog crackle before the tight drums and keys spill nicely into a soulful melodica hook, teased by sound effects. “Dub Woman” prioritizes a funky groove, with a wordless vocal sample kept short. The epic intro of “Pull It Up” paves the way for a reserved electro steppers tune from Dawa Hifi; “Musical Town” sounds like Mungo’s Hi Fi’s Ruff Mi Tuff Riddim except that the expected rough vocals are replaced by a smooth blow-organ melody. That’s the key here: Art-X is clearly cultivating a myriad of sounds, but by interweaving the standout melodica wisely, what could have easily been vintage nostalgia is instead comfortable yet inventive - 70s Jamaican vibes with 40 years of outernational influence.

 

“Dub That” is a solid jam with Ondubground, echoes and reverb in all the right places; Panda Dub takes the controls on “Cotton” with similarly strong results. “Swimming Dub” brings thicker bass into the mix, a trend logically continued on “Heavy Blow” (feat. Hatman). Then “Inity” takes things to a deeper state of consciousness, with Miniman providing a sonic canvas worthy of the classic roots era. “Political War” is more upbeat steppers, with nary a pause, setting up the brassy closer “Radical Plan” by Brain Damage, which is heavy with some massive echo. A lot of standout tracks here, free download via Original Dub Gathering.

 

Representing Cyprus, the Incredible Dub Machine drops some deep heavy dubs. With three original tracks, and a live mix showcasing the best dubs from the island, this is the work of a versatile production and DJ duo . “Ain’t Got No Dub (Melodica Cut)” is a stand-out track: it starts out slow and haunting with a powerful melody while a slow steppers beat emerges beneath. “Traffic Universal” is chaotic and frantic, yet still dubbed-out, with an isolated beat emerging late in the song. The electro-steppers cut “Infected Man” pounds amidst swirls and samples; each song definitely has its own sound.
  
Here’s the live recording, appropriately called “The Rising of Cyprus Dub Live Mix:”

Representing Cyprus, the Incredible Dub Machine drops some deep heavy dubs. With three original tracks, and a live mix showcasing the best dubs from the island, this is the work of a versatile production and DJ duo . “Ain’t Got No Dub (Melodica Cut)” is a stand-out track: it starts out slow and haunting with a powerful melody while a slow steppers beat emerges beneath. “Traffic Universal” is chaotic and frantic, yet still dubbed-out, with an isolated beat emerging late in the song. The electro-steppers cut “Infected Man” pounds amidst swirls and samples; each song definitely has its own sound.

Here’s the live recording, appropriately called “The Rising of Cyprus Dub Live Mix:”