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The Jahtari sound can be jarring - its raw digital reggae is almost still gestating - loaded up with vintage effects and featuring rugged, hazy production. Yet engaging grooves abound, interesting layers emerge from the soundscape, and thoughtful brevity keeps the journey moving ever forward.
 
Monkey Marc lets the void build before unleashing the dark, ambling beat on “Danger Earth,” the first track on this, the fourth installment of the Jahtarian Dubbers compilation series. Pupajim’s high-pitch vocal rides a dissonant shuffle, in an honest - though self-confident - declaration: ‘we not the richest, we not the strongest, we not the best, but we know how to make a hit, we know how to turn on the heat, nobody can stop we.’ EarlyW~Rm’s “The Dub Deal” is echo-laden machine-music dub, distinctive in its murkiness as much as in its high-powered riddim. 7FT Soundsystem contributes the catchy “Shut Ya Mouth,” with Mentor Irie providing the chat.
 
Another powerful vocal follows in “Good Foundation,” El Fata’s reliable and distinctive tenor being paired with a tight 16-bit sound. Label head disrupt’s contribution comes in equal SNES style, a fitting homage to the classic RPG “Chrono Trigger.” Jah Screechy’s upbeat “Love We A Deal With” fades into a sparser groove from Jahtari Riddim Force, which slowly builds, ending more interestingly than it began. Shanghai’s Cha Cha brings it on the breathless crooner “Black Eyes Stranger,” which connects into Diggory Kenrick’s version, entitled “Stranger Flutes,” via a familiar Timothy Leary sample. The eponymous instrument fits surprisingly well against the slow-marching digital beat, mixed in as a proper dub element. Rootah’s “Dancing Chords” provides a brief interlude with some nice Eastern influences, leading to another slow-burner - the Mungo’s Hi Fi / Shanti D collaboration “Know Your Roots.” Over a minimalist beat, the French MC sings of the need for knowledge, as crucial as ever in modern times.
 
A strong statement once again from Jahtari, and in typical vintage fashion the album will be available on cassette (in addition to digital) when it is released on 3 July. Full album preview streaming now:
 

 
The Jahtari sound can be jarring - its raw digital reggae is almost still gestating - loaded up with vintage effects and featuring rugged, hazy production. Yet engaging grooves abound, interesting layers emerge from the soundscape, and thoughtful brevity keeps the journey moving ever forward.

 

Monkey Marc lets the void build before unleashing the dark, ambling beat on “Danger Earth,” the first track on this, the fourth installment of the Jahtarian Dubbers compilation series. Pupajim’s high-pitch vocal rides a dissonant shuffle, in an honest - though self-confident - declaration: ‘we not the richest, we not the strongest, we not the best, but we know how to make a hit, we know how to turn on the heat, nobody can stop we.’ EarlyW~Rm’s “The Dub Deal” is echo-laden machine-music dub, distinctive in its murkiness as much as in its high-powered riddim. 7FT Soundsystem contributes the catchy “Shut Ya Mouth,” with Mentor Irie providing the chat.

 

Another powerful vocal follows in “Good Foundation,” El Fata’s reliable and distinctive tenor being paired with a tight 16-bit sound. Label head disrupt’s contribution comes in equal SNES style, a fitting homage to the classic RPG “Chrono Trigger.” Jah Screechy’s upbeat “Love We A Deal With” fades into a sparser groove from Jahtari Riddim Force, which slowly builds, ending more interestingly than it began. Shanghai’s Cha Cha brings it on the breathless crooner “Black Eyes Stranger,” which connects into Diggory Kenrick’s version, entitled “Stranger Flutes,” via a familiar Timothy Leary sample. The eponymous instrument fits surprisingly well against the slow-marching digital beat, mixed in as a proper dub element. Rootah’s “Dancing Chords” provides a brief interlude with some nice Eastern influences, leading to another slow-burner - the Mungo’s Hi Fi / Shanti D collaboration “Know Your Roots.” Over a minimalist beat, the French MC sings of the need for knowledge, as crucial as ever in modern times.

 

A strong statement once again from Jahtari, and in typical vintage fashion the album will be available on cassette (in addition to digital) when it is released on 3 July. Full album preview streaming now:

 

 

Interrupt & George P combine forces for a vibrant and powerful EP of digital dancehall, equally optimistic about and critical of modern society. In A Rub a Dub Style - heavy on the basslines and featuring poignant vocals - starts with the fast-and-heavy “Ghost Faith,” as George P calls out Babylon for its falsehoods atop some thick drums and synths. “Me No Want To Mean Dancehall” is upbeat vintage in all the right ways, just like the cover art, while “Unite” introduces the slightly slower second half of the album with a conscious message of rub-a-dub. “Wicked Me Nah Wicked” embraces the power of positivity, a slight echo on the vocals paired with a tight bass loop. “Original Style,” pays respect to tradition, both in sound and lyrics, eschewing commercialism for the integrity of the underground dancehall sound. Closer “Suger and Spice” does use the phrase ‘sweet like sugar and spice,’ yet thankfully the smoothly polished vocal is sufficiently entrancing that the cliche is smile (rather than nausea) inducing. Perhaps not as widely acclaimed as Disrupt and Soom T, Interrupt and George P show they are a force to be reckoned with as they balance history with modernity on this promising six-track.
In A Rub a Dub Style by Interrupt & George P

Interrupt & George P combine forces for a vibrant and powerful EP of digital dancehall, equally optimistic about and critical of modern society. In A Rub a Dub Style - heavy on the basslines and featuring poignant vocals - starts with the fast-and-heavy “Ghost Faith,” as George P calls out Babylon for its falsehoods atop some thick drums and synths. “Me No Want To Mean Dancehall” is upbeat vintage in all the right ways, just like the cover art, while “Unite” introduces the slightly slower second half of the album with a conscious message of rub-a-dub. “Wicked Me Nah Wicked” embraces the power of positivity, a slight echo on the vocals paired with a tight bass loop. “Original Style,” pays respect to tradition, both in sound and lyrics, eschewing commercialism for the integrity of the underground dancehall sound. Closer “Suger and Spice” does use the phrase ‘sweet like sugar and spice,’ yet thankfully the smoothly polished vocal is sufficiently entrancing that the cliche is smile (rather than nausea) inducing. Perhaps not as widely acclaimed as Disrupt and Soom T, Interrupt and George P show they are a force to be reckoned with as they balance history with modernity on this promising six-track.

WellWell Sound crafts a low-bit digital reggae sound, with heavy drums and pulsating rhythms. Chemical Dubwise! is mostly instrumental, full of thick effect-laden grooves drawing from classic riddims, with several standout vocal cuts as well. “Wellwell Bionic Sound” sets the tone for the album, with swirling effects and a pounding beat. The remix of Sandeeno’s “Tear Down Babylon” makes the lyrics quite haunting, their poignancy emerging amidst the digital riddim. “Dub Medicament” lets the reverb and echo take over, as if King Tubby’s spirit just spent the night playing Atari. French vocalist Holiden attacks upon the fierce riddim of “Mauvais Mauvais,” which leads quite nicely into the subdued vibe of “Real Badman.” The standout vocal tune comes from Michael Prophet and Ricky Tuffy, who unite for the scorching “Your Love (Remix)” - an uplifting digital dancehall banger. “Drums Of Tron” is delightfully just as expected - more game concept than film, before “Tempo Baroque” takes it to some heavier depths.  King Fula’s track teases dancehall, while the closing remix of Alozade feat Hollow Point and Mr Vegas’ “Unda Mi I Grade (Remix)” delivers to end on a high note. Puns aside, this is a distinct vision of digital reggae from King Dub Records, well-worth the listen and download:

Also well worth checking out - as is every show - is the 09-06-13 Large Up reggae radio show featuring WellWell Sound as the guest selector. Second half of the mix is loaded up with nice remixes, dub plates, and even some special pre-releases!

WellWell Sound crafts a low-bit digital reggae sound, with heavy drums and pulsating rhythms. Chemical Dubwise! is mostly instrumental, full of thick effect-laden grooves drawing from classic riddims, with several standout vocal cuts as well. “Wellwell Bionic Sound” sets the tone for the album, with swirling effects and a pounding beat. The remix of Sandeeno’s “Tear Down Babylon” makes the lyrics quite haunting, their poignancy emerging amidst the digital riddim. “Dub Medicament” lets the reverb and echo take over, as if King Tubby’s spirit just spent the night playing Atari. French vocalist Holiden attacks upon the fierce riddim of “Mauvais Mauvais,” which leads quite nicely into the subdued vibe of “Real Badman.” The standout vocal tune comes from Michael Prophet and Ricky Tuffy, who unite for the scorching “Your Love (Remix)” - an uplifting digital dancehall banger. “Drums Of Tron” is delightfully just as expected - more game concept than film, before “Tempo Baroque” takes it to some heavier depths.  King Fula’s track teases dancehall, while the closing remix of Alozade feat Hollow Point and Mr Vegas’ “Unda Mi I Grade (Remix)” delivers to end on a high note. Puns aside, this is a distinct vision of digital reggae from King Dub Records, well-worth the listen and download:

Also well worth checking out - as is every show - is the 09-06-13 Large Up reggae radio show featuring WellWell Sound as the guest selector. Second half of the mix is loaded up with nice remixes, dub plates, and even some special pre-releases!